Training Manual

Local Community Emergency Response Team (L-CERT)

 

Introductions:

  1. As part of the RegDis (Regional Disaster) project, Local Community Emergency Response Teams (L-CERTs) are established in various communities in Jordan, the Palestinian Authority and Israel.
  2. Each L-CERT will consist of a minimum number of 15 volunteers from the community.
  3. The L-CERTs are targeted to provide an initial first response in all crises, even before the arrival of official first responders to the scene, including:
    • First aid
    • Search and rescue
    • Fire safety
    • Psychosocial support
    • Shelter management
    • Community resilience
  4. Upon the arrival of official first responders, the L-CERTs will continue to work under their responsibility.
  5. In order to build and maintain the competencies of the L-CERTs in achieving their goals, they need to be trained in the diverse domains so that they are capable of providing the first response.

Objectives:

  1. Provide trainers with information needed to enable planning and implementation of L-CERT volunteers’ training program.
  2. Provide training content and materials to be used in the framework of the training program.

The training framework

  1. The training program will consist of a total of 100 hours consisting of:
No. Topic Hours in the volunteer training program
1 Disaster preparedness 3
2 L-CERT mechanisms 5
3 First Aid 30
4 Search & Rescue 15
5 Fire Safety 15
6 Psychosocial support (PSP) & restoring family links 12
7 Vulnerability & capacity assessment 10
8 Shelter management & WASH 5
9 Community resilience 5

Target population:

  1. L-CERTs’ volunteers from the different communities in all three entities.

Training methodologies:

  1. Participatory training methodologies
    • Knowledge Retention Pyramid
    • Interactive Teaching
      • Involves facilitator and learners.
      • Encourage and expect learners to participate.
      • Use questions to stimulate discussion, emphasizing the value of answers.
      • Give participants hands-on experience.
      • Retain attention.
    • Increase Participation

Research shows people will:

  • Listen for only 15-20 minutes without a break.
  • Learn more when given an opportunity to process what they are learning.
  • Retain more if they review or use the information immediately after learning it.
  • Lecturing
    • Lecture is the duct-tape of the teaching world.
    • Lecturing delivers “concepts”.
    • It delivers a lot of information in a short amount of time.
    • Conveys information that is difficult to present in another way.
  • Avoid Over Use Because:
    • In a lecture your learners are passive.
    • Doesn’t guarantee understanding, no feedback from learners.
    • Easily bores the audience unless well prepared.
  • Why use facilitation rather than lecture in a training session?
    • Participants like to be actively involved.
    • Participants want to share knowledge and ideas.
    • You don’t have to be an expert and answer all questions because learners can address questions as well.
    • Keeps group’s attentive and involved.
  • Work Groups
    • Stimulates individual input.
    • Learners obtain feedback from multiple perspectives.
    • Offers opportunity for peer instruction.
    • Allows you to evaluate their learning.
  • Interactive Techniques
    • Think/Pair/Share.
    • Buzz Session.
    • Case Study.
    • Incident Process.
    • Question & Answers.
    • Demonstration
  • Work Groups
    • Stimulates individual input.
    • Learners obtain feedback from multiple perspectives.
    • Offers opportunity for peer instruction.
    • Allows you to evaluate their learning.
  • Think / Pair / Share (5-7 minutes)
    • Pose a question or problem.
    • Give participants one minute to THINK about their answers individually.
    • Have them PAIR with a partner to compare answers.
    • Ask them to SHARE their responses with the class.
  • Buzz Session (10- 15 minutes or <)
    • Divide participants into groups of 3 to 6 participants.

Small size of group allows each participant to contribute

  • Give the groups 3 to 8 minutes to consider a specific, limited problem or question.

Shortness of time requires groups to work hard and stay on target

  • Walk around the room to answer questions.
  • Ask for answers from each group, or provide the answer to on an overhead/flip chart/board.
  • Case Study
    • Provide account of actual problem/situation an individual/group has experienced.
    • Provides a means of analyzing & solving a typical problem.
    • Open-ended proposition that asks the basic question.

–“What would you do?”

–Solution must be practical – the best you can come up with under the circumstances

  • Effective method of provoking controversy & debate on issues for which definite conclusions do not exist.
  • Incident Process
    • Method of learning how to solve problems and work out solutions by using actual incidents that involve real people in real situations.
    • Less formal, less demanding form of case study.
  • Question and Answer Period
    • Allow a certain amount of time for questions at the beginning, middle, or end
    • Plan this time & tell participants about it in advance
    • Questions may be asked orally by individuals, groups, or in writing
  • Asking Questions

Open-Ended Questions

  • Ask questions to get participants to think, analyze, or evaluate
  • Prepare questions ahead of time
  • Questions should not have a single, right answer, e.g., “How could this procedure be improved?” or “What problems might occur with this technique?”

Closed-Ended Questions

  • Have a short, definite answers.
  • Work best when asked fairly rapidly in a series to break the participants out of a passive mode
  • Demonstration
    • Demonstration is one of the most effective teaching methods because of its visual impact.
    • A visual presentation of one or more techniques, processes, skills, etc.
    • You or a participant, often assisted by others, go through the motion of showing, doing, explaining, etc.
  • Other Proven Techniques
    • Peer instruction
    • Practice sessions
    • Discussion
    • Job aids
    • Rol play
    • Brainstorming
    • Games
    • Field Trips
    • Competition
    • Assigned reading
  • Summary
    • Telling is not teaching, nor is listening learning.
    • Engaging participants in learning activities lead to a higher level of understanding and result in the participant’s ability to apply the learning.
    • Interactive teaching is a two-way process of active participant engagement with each other, the facilitator, and the content.

Logistics:

  1. One hour training = 45min
  2. Venue, classrooms and training areas
  3. Light refreshments

Equipment:

  1. Office supplies – markers, pens and note pages
  2. Printed material to hand out
  3. Name tags
  4. Projector & screen
  5. Flipcharts / chalkboard
  6. Training equipment as needed – eg. first aid kit; sophisticated mannequins

Training materials:

  1. The training materials are based on the Train the Trainers (TTT) workshop conducted in Larnaca, Cyprus at February 28th till March 3rd, 2016.

Links to presentations

  1. Disaster preparedness
  1. L-CERT Mechanisms
  1. First Aid
  1. Psychosocial Support (PSP) & Restoring family links
  1. Fire Safety
  1. Search and Rescue
  1. Hygiene & Shelter, Water, Sanitation
  1. Vulnerability & Capacity Assessment
  1. Community resilience